Young catwalk model opens up on her horror experience in the industry

‘Broke, sick and starving’: Young catwalk model opens up on her horror experience in the industry – claiming she was exposed to ‘sexually exploitative clients’ as a teenager

  • NZ model Kizzie Amoore on Wednesday announced that she was taking a break
  • She revealed the dark side of the fashion industry she saw in the past eight years
  • Ms Amoore says the fashion industry needs better regulation in New Zealand

A top model has opened up on her horror experience in the fashion industry, saying she was paid so little she was forced to skip meals and was exposed to ‘sexually exploitative clients’.

New Zealand model Kizzie Amoore on Wednesday announced on Instagram that she was taking a break from the industry after eight years of work and ‘surviving’ at least 100 shows.

Ms Amoore said it’s time she spoke about the dark side of the fashion world. 

New Zealand model Kizzie Amoore on Wednesday announced on Instagram that she was taking a break after eight years of work and ‘surviving’ at least 100 shows

The top model said she was bullied for her tiny frame at age 12, and screamed at for her hip measurement at 15.   

‘This industry grooms young models into valuing themselves solely by their appearance – a sort of microcosm of our overall society – but amplified towards minors,’ she wrote. 

‘I was smoking in place of meals in Paris, as the 70 per cent deduction for tax and commission left me broke and starving most weeks. 

‘Despite having a BMI under 16, the doctor gave me a medical certificate, stating I was healthy enough to walk.’

The top model said she was bullied for her tiny frame at 12, and screamed at for her hip measurement and smile at 15

Ms Amoore alleged doctors are paid to lie about girl’s health. 

‘It’s impossible to have the Haute Couture measurements of 34-24-34 and a height of 5’11 with a BMI greater than 18, so doctors are paid to lie about girls’ health rather than actually change these body standards,’ she said.

The model said she had to learn to budget every cent as there are extreme highs and lows in the fashion industry.

‘Some jobs pay thousands and others don’t come for months,’ Ms Amoore said.

‘Putting my foot down when it’s come to insane contracts, health risks and abusive clients has been a key part of keeping myself safe – both inside and outside of New Zealand.’

Ms Amoore alleged doctors are paid to lie about girl’s health

She says minor models in New Zealand are still being ‘booked unchaperoned with clients who have histories of physical and sexual violence’

Ms Amoore went on to describe the dire conditions in which she says models have to live.

‘You think flatting in Auckland is bad?’ she said. 

‘Try bathrooms without doors, being forced to pay to sleep on couches, constant sickness from overcrowding, pests, general filth and missing chunks of wall, and hosts who threaten and sexually abuse their guests.’

Ms Amoore said she had lived in six countries under a constant threat of deportation. 

‘The standard contract in many countries is that a simple gain of a couple centimetres can mean deportation and debt,’ she said.

‘Most contracts state that all work is to be completely controlled by the agency, leaving it down to their personal discretion on whether to send you to work in poor health.

‘Broke, sick and starving, I was forced to work for promoters, who secretly drugged and sold underage models on the side.

‘I personally worked over 70 hours a week for almost nothing just to pay for my 13 hospitalizations in 11 weeks, yet I am much luckier than those younger and more vulnerable than me who have died from similar conditions.’

Ms Amoore says the fashion industry requires better regulations in New Zealand.

‘Minor models in New Zealand are still being booked unchaperoned with clients who have histories of physical and sexual violence,’ she said. 

‘In 2019, these people have no place in the industry.’ 

Ms Amoore says the fashion industry requires better regulation in New Zealand 

 

 

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