Coronavirus Briefing: What Happened Today

A pharmaceutical company announced a potential treatment for patients with mild or moderate Covid-19.


By Lara Takenaga and Jonathan Wolfe

This is the Coronavirus Briefing, an informed guide to the global outbreak. Sign up here to get this newsletter in your inbox.

Federal Reserve officials expect to leave interest rates near zero through at least 2023.

The Big Ten Conference said it would try to play football as soon as the weekend of Oct. 23, reversing an earlier decision not to compete.

Michael Caputo, the cabinet spokesman who delivered an inflammatory online rant after news reports of interference with official disease reports, will take a leave of absence.

Get the latest updates here, as well as maps and trackers for U.S. metro areas and vaccines in development.

A drugmaker reports positive results for a potential treatment

The pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly announced that a single infusion of its monoclonal antibody treatment was shown to drastically lower levels of the coronavirus in newly infected patients and lower the likelihood of requiring hospitalization.

It is the first potential treatment for patients with mild or moderate Covid-19. (The two other treatments that have proved helpful, the antiviral remdesivir and the steroid dexamethasone, are only for the seriously ill.)

Scientists used blood plasma from Covid-19 survivors, isolating and testing their antibodies to find the most powerful ones. They then manufactured vats of antibodies to make the drug. In a trial of more than 450 newly diagnosed Covid-19 patients, Eli Lilly said, only about 1.7 percent of those who received the drug ended up in the hospital, compared with 6 percent who were given a placebo — a 72 percent risk reduction. Those treated with the drug reportedly also had fewer symptoms, and the levels of virus in their bodies plummeted.

Other companies are also working on treatments with monoclonal antibodies, but they are difficult and expensive to make. A single dose could cost thousands of dollars. They offer only a temporary solution, with the antibodies lasting about a month.

But without a vaccine — the only way to elicit a lasting immune response — the treatment could give doctors another weapon in an arsenal with few options.

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