Abuse victims trapped with partners by surge in the cost-of-living

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All but three percent of Refuge’s frontline staff said the cost-of-living crisis had a significant or severe impact, with many women reliant on food banks for essentials.

Emily, a worker for the charity which supports those fleeing abuse, said: “Working with survivors of domestic abuse through this crisis has been heartbreaking.”

“Recently, a survivor I worked with returned to an abusive partner as she felt she just couldn’t manage living alone as a single parent because of the lack of financial security she has.”

Emily, not her real name to protect her identity, said: “No woman should feel she has no choice but to stay with an abusive partner – or even return to one – because she doesn’t have enough to cover her basic needs.”

“The Government cannot sit back as more women feel forced to make this devastating choice.” “Something needs to be done urgently to protect survivors.”

Nearly three-quarters of those questioned in Refuge’s survey said the cost-of-living crisis is increasing barriers to leaving an abuser while 92 percent said survivors are being pushed further into debt.

Amara: “Leaving was right for me but now I’m struggling”

She said as a single parent, the cost-of-living crisis has had a major impact.

She revealed: “Everyday costs are rising and it’s a constant struggle to make my money work. I’m always anxious  in case of unexpected expenses and the school holidays coming up mean more worries about how to afford to keep the cupboards full and keep my child entertained.” “It seems like there’s no end in sight t this crisis.” 

She revealed: ‘Everyday costs are rising and it’s a constant struggle to make money work. I’m always anxious  in case of unexpected expenses and the school holidays coming up mean more worries about how to afford to keep the cupboards full and keep my child entertained.” “It seems like there’s no end in sight t this crisis.” 

The 29-year-old, whose name has been changed, said many questions run through survivors’ minds when they think about fleeing abuse. 

She said: “Starting ver and having to uproot your life in a completely new city is daunting but I absolutely know this was the right decision for me.”

“Hearing that other survivors are having to weigh up the risks to their personal safety of staying with a perpetrator or facing potential poverty by leaving is devastating”.

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