BBC presenter’s death to be probed to see if vaccine had role after suffering blood clots

AstraZeneca: UK Under-40s to be offered alternative says JCVI

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Lisa Shaw, who worked for BBC Newcastle, developed “severe” headaches a week after having the jab and fell seriously ill a few days later, relatives said in a statement. The 44-year-old died at the Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle, on Friday afternoon having been treated in intensive care for blood clots and bleeding.

 

People under 40 in the UK are being offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca vaccine following reports of extremely rare blood clots on the brain coupled with low blood platelet count.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) had said the benefits of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine continue to outweigh risks for most people.

It has not proven the vaccine causes the clots but has said the link is getting firmer.

 

Since Shaw’s death was announced on air on Sunday, tributes from colleagues and listeners have poured in.

In a statement released by the BBC, the mother-of-one’s family said: “Lisa developed severe headaches a week after receiving her AstraZeneca vaccine and fell seriously ill a few days later.

“She was treated by the Royal Victoria Infirmary’s intensive care team for blood clots and bleeding in her head.

(More to follow)

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