Harry ‘tapping into vogue for victimhood’ with book’s title

Prince Harry 'wasn't treated like a spare' says Angela Levin

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Prince Harry appears to be tapping into the Vogue for victimhood” with his “strange” choice of title for his new memoir, a royal commentator has said. Publisher Penguin Random House last week released a picture of the cover of the new book, entitled Spare, and featuring the Duke of Sussex gazing intently into the camera.

Published on January 10, 2023, it promises an honest assessment of Harry’s life to date, possibly offering more details on the well-publicised rifts which appear to have driven a wedge between him and the British Royals since his marriage to Meghan Markle in 2018.

Specifically, there is speculation he may refer to Megan‘s claim, during an interview with Oprah Winfrey, that an unspecified member of the Royal Family speculated about the skin tone of unborn child Archie, as well as offering a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the mood at Queen Elizabeth II‘s funeral

Jonathan Sacerdoti, whose credits include the BBC, Sky News and Fox News, zeroed in on the decision to name it Spare, in reference to the common description of the second-born son of the monarch.

He might as well have called it ‘victim’

Jonathan Sacerdoti

Citing the Prince’s new life in California with Meghan, Archie, and baby sister Lilienthal, Mr Sacerdoti told Express.co.uk: “One would hope that by now, especially with therapy and a new life abroad away from the duties he once had, he’d have moved on and not felt the need to title his book that way.

“He might as well have called it ‘victim’. It’s a catchy and clever title but quite sad.

“In fact he seems keen to tap into the vogue for victimhood that maybe plays well with some of his intended audience.”

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He added: “The title is strange: he really wasn’t treated as a spare in many people’s eyes even when he was a working royal.

“He was massively popular, and was respected by many for his military service.”

Harry’s role had enabled him to pursue his interests, “live a life of fun and parties” and still continue to be a working member of the Royal Family, Mr Sacerdoti pointed out.

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He added: “He was still able to let his personality show through more than William was perhaps allowed, unburdened by the extra responsibility of knowing he’d be king one day.

“He had a defined and rewarding role and was constantly looked after and made to be a key part of the royal family’s work rather than a spare to its main aims and endeavours.”

Mr Sacerdoti said: “Some people may wonder if he feels a spare now, in his new life.

“He’s often seen as playing second fiddle to his actress wife and her ambitions to present audio programmes, write picture books, and possibly even start a political career in America.

“He features occasionally in her publicity as a walk on character – commenting on hairstyles or clowning about outside a window.”

A press release issued by Penguin Random House on Friday said: “Written with raw, unflinching honesty, Spare finds the Prince writing about some moments from his life publicly for the first time.

“For the first time, he writes about the moment he and his brother William, young princes still, walked behind their mother’s coffin as the world watched on.

“Spare also covers Prince Harry’s dedication to service, the military duty that twice took him to the frontlines of Afghanistan, and the joy he has found in being a husband and father. It offers an honest and captivating personal portrait, one that shows readers that behind everything they think they know about the Prince lies a story that is variably inspiring, courageous, and eye-opening.

Speaking when the deal was first announced last year, Harry said: “I’m writing this not as the prince I was born but as the man I have become.

“I’ve worn many hats over the years, both literally and figuratively, and my hope is that in telling my story – the highs and lows, the mistakes, the lessons learned – I can help show that no matter where we come from, we have more in common than we think.”

Harry is supporting two British charities with proceeds from the book – £1.3million to Sentebale, which supports vulnerable children and young people in Lesotho and Botswana affected by HIV/AIDS, and £260,000 to WellChild, of which he has been Royal patron for 15 years.

Express.co.uk has approached Prince Harry for comment via Archewell.

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