‘Like phoenix from ashes’ Harry to use book to ‘rewrite his story’ to become US leader

Prince Harry will 'miss the UK' more and more says expert

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Prince Harry is said to have put the finishing touches on his memoir, with royal watchers eagerly awaiting the “wholly truthful” account of his life. The Duke of Sussex’s memoir was announced back in July last year, and its release is expected to fall around the festive season. With the content of the book largely unknown, there has been mass speculation surrounding what Harry might say. 

Many have predicted the book may reveal insight into his life within the House of Windsor and could address the reported rift between the Sussexes and the Royal Family. 

But one royal commentator has claimed the prince will use his memoir to “rewrite his story” in a bid to be seen “as a leader in the United States”.

Kinsey Schofield, founder of ToDiForDaily.com and author of the upcoming book ‘R is for Revenge Dress’, told Express.co.uk: “What I think he’s trying to do is brand himself as a Mark Zuckerberg, Barack Obama — some guy that can get $100,000 dollars for a speech in Miami to a bunch of rich dudes. 

“I think he is trying to brand himself as a leader in the United States and will use his book to try to do that.

“He wanted to try to rewrite his story and to be this phoenix rising from the ashes. 

“That is the route I think he is going to go.”

When it emerged that the Duke of Sussex was penning a memoir, many feared that certain members of the Royal Family would be on the receiving end of an attack. 

Prince Charles, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Prince William were pointed out as potential fatalities. 

However, Ms Schofield argued that Harry is unlikely to use the book to criticise his family, suggesting he may discuss the death of his mother, but will not write anything that “could destroy” the House of Windsor. 

She said: “I think Harry is going to try to tell a story about a young man who overcomes adversity — that’s truly what I think this is going to be. 

“He is going to discuss the death of his mother I believe and he’s going to talk about how that affected him as a young adult, and how he turned that emotion into the leader he is today.”

She continued: “Now, will his publisher allow people like us to discuss what horrible things he might mention in his book? Absolutely, because they want it to sell. They want those pre-orders to go out the roof.

“But I don’t think that it is in Prince Harry’s DNA to write something salacious that could destroy his family because, at the end of the day, his children could benefit from that relationship, from anything that is good that is happening to the Royal Family — his children could benefit from. 

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“I don’t think Prince Harry is going to burn the whole place down with this book. I think he is going to use this book to elevate himself.”

Since Harry and his wife Meghan Markle left the Firm, they have been working to establish their careers outside of the Firm. 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex set up their own non-profit organisation Archewell, signed multi-million pound deals with streaming giants and pursued more philanthropic and humanitarian ventures. 

While they are yet to release content with Netflix, and have only one podcast episode on Spotify, the couple’s humanitarian efforts have been recognised. 

It was recently revealed that Archewell is to receive the gong from the Human First Coalition for its work advocating for Afghan refugees. 

The organisation points out that Archewell had offered generous financial support for at-risk Afghans as well as military veterans who served in Afghanistan. 

The awards ceremony will take place in New York City on Monday — the year-anniversary of the Taliban takeover of the country. 

However, Harry and Meghan won’t be there to receive the award, instead, executive director of the Archewell Foundation James Holt will accept the honour.

Harry spent 10 years in the British Army and completed two tours of duty in Afghanistan. 

He later set up the Invictus Games — a sporting event for veterans and sick, injured or wounded servicemen and women. 

And at the time of the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan last year, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex issued a statement commenting on how “exceptionally fragile” the world is. 

In the statement, which was published on the Archewell website, the couple wrote: “The world is exceptionally fragile right now.

“As we all feel the many layers of pain due to the situation in Afghanistan, we are left speechless.”

It continued: “When any person or community suffers, a piece of each of us does so with them, whether we realise it or not. 

“And though we are not meant to live in a state of suffering, we, as a people, are being conditioned to accept it. 

“It’s easy to find ourselves feeling powerless, but we can put our values into action — together.”

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