Meghan and Harry slammed for taking Netflix contract ‘away from young talent’

Meghan Markle ‘focused’ on producing says Netflix CEO

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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex broke their silence this week on the situation in Afghanistan, saying they were “speechless”. Harry, 36, participated in two frontline tours of Afghanistan in 2008 and 2012, during his 10-year stint in the British Army. Writing on their website, Archewell, the couple said, “we all feel the many layers of pain due to the situation in Afghanistan, we are left speechless”, as they encouraged people to donate to organisations in need.

The statement broke away from recent announcements that have largely revolved on the pair’s work.

Some of their most anticipated projects come as part of a mammoth £109million Netflix deal.

Harry is making a documentary following competitors in next year’s Invictus Games – ‘Heart of Invictus’ – and Meghan is busy producing ‘Pearl’, an animated show that will see a 12-year-old girl’s “heroic adventures” as she talks to noteworthy women from history.

While many are excited about both series’, others are less impressed.

When the deal was announced, Jane Moore of Loose Women, voiced outrage.

She said she believed they had bagged the contract because of “who they are” not “what they have proved they can do”.

Ms Moore also admitted that it “irritated” her to see the couple chosen over “young talent”.

When asked whether they deserved the deal, she replied: “No. End of discussion.”

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She continued: “It irritates the hell out of me.

“I’m a writer myself. I know there are so many writers and producers, there is so much young talent out there trying to come through, who would love to get into Netflix’s door – let alone be given this deal.

“They have been given this deal because of who they are, not because of what they have proved they can do.”

She said she would have had no problem with the deal had Meghan and Harry spent time building their portfolio of work in the same way as other creatives.

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However, she added: “I’m all for if, ten years down the line, they have made lots of programmes and come up quietly and got the deal then [that would be different].

“But I think, them just parachuting in is not good for the creative industry as a whole, Ryan Murphy has a deal, Shonda Rhimes, these are proven really good creative writers, producers, creators.”

In a statement at the time of the deal, Meghan and Harry said: “Through our work with diverse communities and their environments, to shining a light on people and causes around the world, our focus will be on creating content that informs but also gives hope.

“As new parents, making inspirational family programming is also important to us, as is powerful storytelling through a truthful and relatable lens.”

Others have been less critical of the pair.

Marlene Koenig, a royal expert, told Express.co.uk she thought it was “great and important” that Meghan particularly was focusing on female empowerment aimed at a young audience.

She said: “They’re looking for projects that support what their work wants to be like in supporting minorities and mental health – telling stories that will be of interest.”

‘Heart of Invictus’ will be close to Harry’s heart not only because it is his first film production, but also because he founded the games in 2014.

He also set-up the Invictus Games Foundation, which supports veterans.

Now, he and Meghan have called on international organisations to help both humanitarian crises unfolding in Afghanistan and Haiti following an earthquake, and support for UK veterans who fought in the Central Asian country in the last 20 years.

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