Meghan and Harry warned royal reconciliation now ‘impossible’ – expert

Meghan Markle ‘distancing herself’ from Netflix says pundit

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Meghan and Harry may find reconciliation with the royal family “impossible” after the release of their upcoming Netflix documentary, according to a royal commentator. The couple was set to release the docuseries at the end of this year, however it’s now unclear when it will come out following backlash over Netflix’s hit series ‘The Crown’.

The content of the project is unknown, however the royal family is likely on tenterhooks over the docuseries – the Sussexes themselves were reportedly having second thoughts on the project.

“Of course, there’s a great deal of concern about potential attacks on the monarchy in the Netflix documentary. We don’t know exactly what what’s going to be in it but her track record suggests that she will not be holding back on attacking the the monarchy despite her thriving off her royal title,” said royal commentator Nile Gardiner.

If the series, or Prince Harry’s upcoming memoir, contain harsh criticisms of the royal family, it could make reconciliation “impossible”, according to Mr Gardiner.

He said: “I think that the Netflix documentary plus Harry’s book may well make an reconciliation with the royal family impossible. Especially if they contain major attacks upon the royal family and the institution of the British monarchy.”

A divide is believed to have emerged within the royal family when the Sussexes stepped down from royal life and moved to Montecito, California in 2020.

However, tensions neared a breaking point following the Sussexes’ bombshell interview with TV superstar Oprah Winfrey during which Prince Harry claimed his brother, Prince William, and father, King Charles III, were “trapped” in the royal family.

Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, there was hope among royal watchers that the Sussexes would be brought back into the fold.

But with the “reckless” release of the series – a deal reportedly worth a staggering $100 million – it could end all chance of rapprochement.

Mr Gardiner said: “I think these projects could well be complete bridge burners in terms of the relationship with the with the royal family.

“There appears to be a great deal of recklessness involved in terms of both the the Netflix documentary and Prince Harry’s forthcoming book.”

He added that he saw “little prospect” of a reconciliation between the two sides of the family.

The comments come amid speculation surrounding the release date for the Netflix series.

It had been reported that it would come out as planned in 2022, however sources recently told Deadline that Netflix had “blinked first” and that the docuseries would be postponed until 2023.

Meghan and Harry were reportedly having second thoughts over the documentary following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, however the streaming giant is said to have pressed for the project to go ahead

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Now, there has been backlash over Netflix’s depiction of the royals in its upcoming season 5 of ‘The Crown’ which will be released in November.

First, former Prime Minister John Major took issue with a scene in the show where he meets with Prince Charles who appears to press for the forced abdication of the Queen.

Mr Major insists that this meeting never took place calling it a “barrel-load off nonsense” in a statement given to The Telegraph.

Meanwhile, actress Dame Judy Dench hit out at the show, writing for The Times, and demanded a disclaimer calling it a work of fiction.

“The closer the drama comes to our present times, the more freely it seems willing to blur the lines between historical accuracy and crude sensationalism,” she wrote.

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