Prince Charles visits Bucharest refugee centre as royal meets Ukrainians affected by war

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The Prince of Wales is the first senior royal to visit the region since the start of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Charles visited a centre near Bucharest, which supports the rising number of refugees.

Charles was welcomed by Romanian President Klaus Iohannis at the Cotroceni Palace.

He then visited a refugee center that provides fresh clothing, food, baby equipment and key essentials. 

The Prince was also taken to see dormitories that have been specially created to house more refugees as the war continues. 

Charles was joined by Her Majesty Margareta, Custodian of the Crown of Romania at the Romexpo Donation Centre for Ukrainian refugees in Bucharest. 

Margareta, the eldest daughter of King Michael I and Queen Anne of Romania, assumed her father’s duties upon his retirement in March 2016.

Charles was joined by Her Majesty Margareta, Custodian of the Crown of Romania at the Romexpo Donation Centre for Ukrainian refugees in Bucharest. 

Margareta, the eldest daughter of King Michael I and Queen Anne of Romania, assumed her father’s duties upon his retirement in March 2016.

The group spoke with Ukrainians who have fled the horrors of war, with more than 1,000 Ukrainians visit the centre every day to receive food, supplies and access to social services and counsel during their stay in Romania. 

They also met with volunteers who are supporting the effort at the centre.

In March, Charles made a rare royal intervention into the Ukraine war and called Russia’s attacks “unconscionable”.

In Southend-on-Sea along with Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, the Prince of Wales spoke about Sir David Amess’ murder.

The royal said: “What we saw in the terrible tragedy in Southend was an attack on democracy, on an open society, on freedom itself. 

“We are seeing those same values under attack today in Ukraine in the most unconscionable way. 

“In the stand we take here, we are in solidarity with all those who are resisting brutal aggression.”

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