Prince Harry and Meghan Markle ‘always wanted independence AND publicity’

We will use your email address only for sending you newsletters. Please see our Privacy Notice for details of your data protection rights.

Harry and Meghan’s plan to become “financially independent” of the Royal Family raised eyebrows within royal circles, especially as they are known to enjoy a more lavish lifestyle. While they no longer have access to the Sovereign Grant, they still receive an allowance from Prince Charles to cover their extensive security bill. However, with a historic Netflix deal now securely under their belt — estimated to be worth £74.5million — the couple finally have their own guaranteed income.

Still, the Sussexes’ faced a wave of public fury when it was announced they would be producing — and occasionally appearing in — documentaries on the popular streaming platform.

Critics claimed they were contradicting their own appeal for a “private life” away from the royal limelight.

Yet, their previous statements about their decision to step down as senior royals shows they only wanted to control their own media output, rather than to stop it altogether.

Their first bombshell statement released on Instagram in January read: “We have chosen to make a transition this year in starting to carve out a progressive new role within this institution.

“We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen.”

They did not seek to become private citizens themselves, although that is what they hope for their one-year-old son Archie, but instead admitted they wanted to still be tied to the crown.

The couple also wanted to continue supporting the Queen and the Commonwealth, as well as their patronages.

Towards the end of the statement though, they explain they wanted to provide “our family with the space to focus on the next chapter”.

“We intend to step back as ‘senior’ members of the Royal Family and work to become financially independent, while continuing to fully support Her Majesty The Queen.”

They did not seek to become private citizens themselves, although that is what they hope for their one-year-old son Archie, but instead admitted they wanted to still be tied to the crown.

The couple also wanted to continue supporting the Queen and the Commonwealth, as well as their patronages.

Towards the end of the statement though, they explain they wanted to provide “our family with the space to focus on the next chapter”.

DON’T MISS
Prince Harry ‘not ready’ to give up royal status as title row rages [INSIGHT]
Royal heartbreak: George’s godmother in touching Diana confession [EXPLAINED]
Finding Freedom ‘eclipsed Sussexes’ work’ instead of exposing goals [EXPOSED]

Indeed, royal correspondent for the Daily Express, Richard Palmer, tweeted this week: “Harry and Meghan couldn’t cope with the normal scrutiny that goes with being prominent royals and those family rifts were real, as they now admit.

“But it was always their desire to go off and make money from commercial deals that was behind the split and their move to America.”

The couple have been quick to protect their privacy on occasion — with Meghan recently claiming she felt “prohibited from defending herself” against negative press — and keen to secure a new home which is in secretive Santa Barbara.

However, their attitude towards the latest sympathetic account, Finding Freedom, suggests once again that it is not exposure they fought against, but their own control over it.

Journalist Camilla Tominey noted last month: “Ordinarily, one would expect a pair as fiercely protective of their privacy as the Sussexes to issue a stern legal rebuke to the grotesque intrusion this book so patently represents.”

The Sussexes’ spokesperson said the two were not interviewed for the unauthorised book, nor cooperated with its authors, Omdi Scobie and Carolyn Durand.

But as royal correspondent for The Times Roya Nikkah said: “Harry and Meghan’s still-raw rage leaps off the pages.”

Ms Tominey also noted in The Telegraph, the book “has strangely heralded not a whiff of discontent” from the pair, suggesting that, as the book is sympathetic to their cause, the Sussexes did not protest.

With their Netflix deal, the two will be able to control their own media output as they did when they set up their own Instagram account, the now defunct @sussexroyal.

Source: Read Full Article