Prince Harry challenged on ‘glib’ therapy comments: ‘It’s alright for you!’

Prince Harry is ‘playing a dangerous game’ claims royal expert

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The Duke of Sussex has opened up about how he started therapy four years ago and how it has helped improve his mental wellbeing. He spoke frankly during his Apple TV+ docu-series entitled ‘The Me You Can’t See’, which he created alongside Oprah Winfrey. He even agreed to be filmed undergoing a therapy called Eye Movement and Reprocessing and Desensitisation (EMDR), which helps people process trauma.

However, it has been pointed out that, while it is fantastic that therapy helped him so much, not everyone has access to it, because it can be very expensive. In the UK, waiting lists for talking therapies on the NHS can be over a year long, while going privately is only accessible to those who can afford it. In the US, over 10 percent of people do not have any health insurance at all, while many more will not be covered for these kinds of therapies. Harry, as a royal and multi-millionaire in his own right, will not have faced these barriers or even been aware of them, which is a privilege in itself.

Pod Save the Queen is hosted by Ann Gripper and features Daily Mirror royal editor Russell Myers.

Ms Gripper said: “One review I saw was like, it’s interesting, you feel sorry for him, but it’s a bit glib.

“And there was that focus on ‒ essentially it’s all very well if you can get expensive therapy, but for other people, it’s a bit tricky.”

The royal commentators also picked up on the fact Harry claims he started therapy when Meghan suggested it after an argument, while in the past he said he started counselling after William’s encouragement.

In 2017, Harry was a guest on Bryony Gordon’s podcast Mad World, in which she interviews high-profile guests about their mental health experiences.

In the interview, Harry said he had “shut down” all his emotions for 20 years after the death of his mother, despite William trying to persuade him to get professional help.

However, he finally decided to go to counselling when he was 32 after his anxiety got to an unbearable level.

However, he later attributed getting therapy to his wife Meghan, causing some confusion among royal fans.

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However, Ms Gripper argued that both could be correct and suggested that the initial counselling may have been “a sticking plaster” before getting therapy that was a more long-term solution.

That said, even if this was the case, it is still surprising for Harry not to mention the earlier phase of getting help.

The podcast host said: “That happened a few years ago so maybe that was a sticking plaster type thing to get him through some stuff but therapy is more, trying to have a longer term resolution.

“But I think it is interesting that he’s not mentioned that earlier phase of getting help as much in the current wave of discussion.”

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She concluded that Harry being filmed undergoing therapy to “reprogramme his brain” on how to deal with being back in London was “extraordinary sharing”.

Harry disclosed in the Apple TV+ documentary that he suffered from anxiety, depression and PTSD and had suffered in silence for many years.

However, that all changed when he met Meghan.

He said: “I saw GPs. I saw doctors. I saw therapists. I saw alternative therapists. I saw all sorts of people, but it was meeting and being with Meghan.

“I knew that if I didn’t do the therapy and fix myself that I was going to lose this woman who I could see spending the rest of my life with.”

He explained that the realisation came after a row, saying: “When [Meghan] said, ‘I think you need to see someone,’ it was in reaction to an argument that we had.

“And in that argument, not knowing about it, I reverted back to 12-year-old Harry.”

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