Queen was furious with Prince Philip after row at 5am: ‘She was not happy’

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Today will be a difficult day for The Queen as it is her first wedding anniversary since the passing of the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. The difficult milestone, seven months after Philip died at the age of 99, would have seen the royal couple celebrate 74 years of marriage. It is also a month since the Queen was admitted to hospital overnight for preliminary investigations and ordered by her royal doctors to rest. Their enduring relationship lasted the longest of any British sovereign and Philip was at the Queen’s side throughout the decades, supporting her as she devoted herself to her role as head of state.

Following his death in April, the Queen said she and her family were in a “period of great sadness”, but that she was comforted by the tributes paid to him.

She added: “We have been deeply touched, and continue to be reminded that Philip had such an extraordinary impact on countless people throughout his life.”

The Queen and Philip spent many decades together, travelling around the world on royal engagements.

This included a story from Balmoral when Philip had an argument with a personal protection officer.

Royal author Robert Jobson told the story in his book, Prince Philip’s Century: The Extraordinary Life of the Duke of Edinburgh – released earlier this year.

On ITV’s Royal Rota podcast with ITV’s royal editor Chris Ship, he told the story of Philip’s 5am argument which didn’t impress the Queen.

He said: “There was another incident in the book which I found very funny after I spoke to various unnamed sources.

“There was a story at Balmoral where if Philip was on holiday he was very much on holiday.

“And he was up at 5am, he’s a very active character, long before the Queen’s pipers woke her up with the pipes. So he starts a huge row with a personal protection officer who was allocated to him and asked him ‘what are you doing?’

“He said ‘I don’t need you, I’m on holiday’.”

Prince Philip is said to have then “erupted” into a full-on argument around 5.30am. This did not go down well with the Queen, though. According to Mr Jobson, she made her feelings at being woken up plain in a typically dignified manner.

Mr Jobson continued: “Her majesty opens the window and asks Philip what on earth is the matter. At which point he realises he has overstepped the mark.

“And he knew there were limits and when the Queen wasn’t very happy she only had to say a couple of words and he knew he overstepped the mark.”

The Queen and Prince Philip made annual trips to Balmoral, a royal residence that is thought to be one of Her Majesty’s favourites, due to its peaceful surroundings.

Princess Elizabeth and Philip first met in 1934 at the wedding of Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark and Prince George, the Duke of Kent, and fell in love five years later.

Philip entertained his future wife by jumping over the tennis nets.

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King George VI’s official biographer, Sir John Wheeler-Bennett, recalled: “This was the man with whom Princess Elizabeth had been in love from their first meeting.”

The engagement of the cousins was officially announced on July 9, 1947, and the wedding took place just four months later on November 20, 1947, at Westminster Abbey.

Princess Elizabeth, the future Queen was the 10th member of the Royal Family to be married at Westminster Abbey.

Together, the couple celebrated the Queen’s Silver, Golden and Diamond Jubilees and faced the highs and lows of life.

The Duke once said: “It may not be quite so important when things are going well, but it is absolutely vital when the going gets difficult.

“You can take it from me that the Queen has the quality of tolerance in abundance.”

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