Schoolgirl, 5, leaves strangers in tears with random acts of kindness

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A mother and her daughter have been surprising people all over the Wirral Peninsula in the North of England with random acts of kindness.

Sophie-Louise Corrigan alongside her five-year-old daughter, Amina, from New Brighton , have been leaving members of the public in tears by gifting them either a bouquet of flowers or a box of chocolates.

Every week, Sophie allows Amina, a Wallasey Mount Primary School pupil, to choose a random stranger to put a smile on their face.

Sophie takes Amina around different parts of the Wirral and lets her daughter choose someone on the street to gift a bouquet of flowers or a box of chocolates. These surprise gifts have left people “in tears”.

Sophie, who is originally from Skelmersdale, moved to the area two years ago. The tradition began with her own mum, Sarah, and after Amina was learning about “kind hands and kind hearts” in school, she felt it was the perfect time to introduce Amina to “kind acts and kind voices”.

Sophie revealed that these random acts of kindness have become a strategy to help with her mental health. 

She told Express.co.uk: “a few years back I struggled really bad with my mental health. I was mixing with the wrong people. Then, I was in hospital for around three months recovering from an incident.” 

This experience was transformative for Sophie. She continued: “So to know that people go through different things every day of their lives and when we walk past them we’re none the wiser. I never thought of mental health before my own experience [but] when I woke up in hospital it was like a completely different me.

Even though me and my mum had been doing it for years before [random acts of kindness] are now [more important to us] so we’ve upped it to two or three times a week. It helps my mental health a lot and it really helps others too.”

The strangers Sophie and Amina stop in the street are overwhelmed when they receive their gift. Often, she said, people start crying and that’s when Sophie knows “they really needed this.”

Sophie said, “mental health can be a really touchy subject” for a lot of people, so presenting strangers with a gift breaks through barriers sparking a human connection that goes beyond words.

The mother-daughter-duo continued the meaningful act whilst abroad.

Sophie said: “Myself and mum used to always do it, whenever we had some money left from the weekly shop or if we really wanted to do it that week, we deducted something from the shop to make sure we had the money, we would always do it.”

“Now, we (Sophie and Amina) do it everywhere, even when we went on holiday to Turkey we did a random act of kindness there. We find flowers, roses and chocolates whether it be in Ormskirk, Liverpool city centre or the Wirral. Wherever we go we do it.”

Despite struggling some weeks themselves with the ongoing cost-of-living crisis, what makes it all worthwhile is the stranger’s reaction to Amina.

Sophie added: “The reaction is amazing and is one of the reasons why we carry on. The number of people who speak to us and don’t even know what to say, they are speechless. There’s been a lot of people who give Amina a hug after and she loves that. There are others who have teared up and said that they’ve had such a horrible week either with bills or a family death and Amina will always say to me that although the person was crying, it was happy tears. She’s understanding how acts of kindness work and how emotions work.”

Although Sophie can’t be sure exactly what lessons Amina will learn she knows that it shows her daughter that through kindness it’s possible to “connect” to others despite barriers. 

After hearing about the kind acts in school, one of Amina’s friends wants to join in. 

Sophie said: “So it’s having a massive impact on everyone.”

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