Brexit campaign team LOSING CONTROL of No10 with Cummings now considering resignation

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There are concerns the reform agenda championed by members of the official Brexit campaign will be put on the back-burner, should Remainers and Establishment stalwarts take back control of Downing Street.

Last night, one of the Prime Minister’s most senior aides, Lee Cain, announced he will be stepping down as director of communications after a tussle for power inside No10.

Mr Cain was the press officer for the Vote Leave campaign and has been a key ally of Boris Johnson.

Mr Cain worked with Mr Cummings and the Prime Minister in the Vote Leave campaign to get the UK out of the European Union.

Mr Cummings – the Prime Minister’s most senior and high-profile adviser – is said to be furious Mr Cain had been forced out.

An insider claimed Mr Cumming’s future is in doubt and could depart alongside Mr Cain.

Other close members of the Vote Leave team who work in No10 are also said to be considering their positions.

Mr Cain’s resignation comes at a crucial time where the Government is facing big decisions over the future of post-Brexit trade with the EU.

Negotiations with the EU are currently ongoing with both sides holding crucial talks to agree a deal before the end of the transition period.

A number of MPs celebrated Mr Cain’s departure with some saying they would be “over the moon” if Mr Cummings also resigned.

One senior MP told the Guardian: “Boris must take this chance to pivot back to being the liberal unifier, sack a chunk of these cabinet no-hopers and start a new team, but it does look like tonight that Carrie and those urging a more inclusive Boris are winning.”

But some fear the departure of the Vote Leave team would mean to Conservatives would no longer prioritise the levelling up agenda and civil service reform championed by the Prime Minister over the last 12 months.

Announcing his departure, Mr Cain said: “It has been a privilege to work as an adviser for Mr Johnson for the last three years – being part of a team that helped him win the Tory leadership contest, secure the largest Conservative majority for three decades – and it was an honour to be asked to serve as the prime minister’s chief of staff.

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“I would like to thank all the team at No10 – including the many unsung and incredibly talented civil servants – for their hard work and support during the last 18 months.

“And most of all I would like to thank the prime minister for his loyalty and leadership.

“I have no doubt that under his premiership the country will deliver on the promises made in the 2019 election campaign and build back better from the coronavirus pandemic.”

The Prime Minister issued a statement on Mr Cain’s resignation and said: “I want to thank Lee for his extraordinary service to the government over the last four years.

“He has been a true ally and friend and I am very glad that he will remain director of communications until the new year and to help restructure the operation.

“He will be much missed.”

Over the last year, a number of senior civil servants have announced they will be leaving their posts.

Jonathan Slater, the chief civil servant at the Department for Education, was sacked in August following the row over exam results across England.

Mr Slater was the fifth permanent secretary to leave his post in just six months.

In July, Sir Richard Heaton resigned from his position at the Ministry of Justice (MoJ).

He said it was a “privilege” to lead at the MoJ despite the “challenging years”.

Sir Philip Rutnam stepped down as permanent secretary of the Home Office back in February.

Mr Rutman announced he would be taking Home Secretary Priti Patel to an employment tribunal.

In June, Sir Simon McDonald also stepped down from his position at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office “at the request” of Mr Johnson.

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