Brexit ULTIMATUM: Boris Johnson hits EU with final no deal warning – ‘Accept and move on!’

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The Prime Minister is set to tell the EU on Monday that if an agreement is not reached by both sides before the October 15 deadline, they should “accept that and move on.” A statement released to the press, revealed Mr Johnson’s proposition ahead of the start of the new round of discussions set to begin on Tuesday in London.

The statement reads: “If we can’t agree by then, then I do not see that there will be a free-trade agreement between us, and we should both accept that and move on.

“We will then have a trading arrangement with the EU like Australia’s.

“I want to be absolutely clear that, as we have said right from the start, that would be a good outcome for the UK.

“As a government we are preparing, at our borders and at our ports, to be ready for it.

“We will have full control over our laws, our rules, and our fishing waters.”

Mr Johnson has been insisting on the prospect of a trade deal similar to the one the EU currently has with Canada.

However, the EU has rejected that possibility due to the UK’s geographical proximity to the EU.

The Prime Minister said: “Even at this late stage, if the EU are ready to rethink their current positions and agree this I will be delighted.

“But we cannot and will not compromise on the fundamentals of what it means to be an independent country to get it.”

READ MORE: EU warned Scotland will not budge on Brexit fisheries deal by Tory MSP

UK Brexit negotiator David Frost mirrored Mr Johnson’s stance on a No Deal Brexit scenario, sending out a clear message to the EU.

In an interview with the Mail on Sunday, Lord Frost said Mr Johnson’s Government would be more bullish on its intention to leave the EU than Theresa May’s.

He said: “We came in after a Government and negotiating team that had blinked and had its bluff called at critical moments and the EU had learned not to take our word seriously.

“So a lot of what we are trying to do this year is to get them to realise that we mean what we say and they should take our position seriously.”

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Lord Frost added that the EU “have not accepted that in key areas of our national life we want to be able to control our own laws and do things our way and use the freedoms that come after Brexit.”

“We are not going to be a client state.

“We are not going to compromise on the fundamentals of having control over our own laws.

“We are not going to accept level playing field provisions that lock us in to the way the EU do things; we are not going to accept provisions that give them control over our money or the way we can organise things here in the UK and that should not be controversial – that’s what being an independent country is about, that’s what the British people voted for and that’s what will happen at the end of the year, come what May.”

A source close to the negotiations said the discussions had been escalated in July in order to create a broad blueprint of a deal this summer.

But the source added: “Due to the EU’s repeated refusal to accept that in key areas we need to do things in our own way, reflecting our new status as a sovereign, independent country, those difficult discussions are ongoing.”

The insider said the UK had a critical round of discussions ahead.

They added: “The EU must also realise that we are serious about leaving with an Australian-style trading relationship and reclaiming our independence as a sovereign nation if we cannot find acceptable terms.

“The whole Government has been extensively preparing to ensure that businesses and citizens are ready for the end of the transition period in any scenario. Outside the customs union, outside the single market and outside the EU.”

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