Presidential debate organizers promise format changes after Tuesday’s chaos

WASHINGTON — The Commission on Presidential Debates announced Wednesday that it is considering format changes for remaining debates after President Donald Trump repeatedly disregarded the rules, resulting in a chaotic debate that lacked in substantive policy conservation.

“Last night’s debate made clear that additional structure should be added to the format of the remaining debates to ensure a more orderly discussion of the issues,” the CPD said in a statement. “The CPD will be carefully considering the changes that it will adopt and will announce those measures shortly.”

The CPD works with both candidates ahead of the debates to arrive at an agreed-upon set of rules. Changing the structure of the debates last-minute is highly unusual and a testament to just how out of control Tuesday night’s event was.

Although Fox News moderator Chris Wallace was criticized by some for not controlling the conversation and letting Trump dominate the stage, the CPD thanked Wallace for his work.

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“The Commission is grateful to Chris Wallace for the professionalism and skill he brought to last night’s debate and intends to ensure that additional tools to maintain order are in place for the remaining debates,” they said.

It is unclear exactly what changes the CPD will adopt and whether the candidates will agree to them.

Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., will meet next Wednesday for the only vice presidential debate of the election cycle.

The next presidential debate between Trump and Biden is on Oct. 15 in Miami, and it is currently supposed to be a town hall format. They are scheduled to go head to head in the final presidential debate on Oct. 22 in Nashville.

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