Breonna Taylor: Kentucky AG will release grand jury recording in case

The Kentucky attorney general will release a recording of the grand jury proceedings in the Breonna Taylor case, a spokesman said hours after one of the jurors filed a court motion seeking the action so “the truth may prevail,” according to reports.

The unidentified grand juror — who assailed Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s statements last week – also asked a judge to allow the panel’s members to give up their confidential status if they choose to discuss the explosive Louisville case, the Courier-Journal reported.

Former Detective Brett Hankison has been charged with wanton endangerment for shooting through the 26-year-old EMT’s window during a botched March 13 raid, with the bullets going into an occupied neighboring apartment.

Hankison, Sgt. Jon Mattingly and Detective Miles Cosgrove busted into Taylor’s apartment with a narcotics warrant and exchanged gunfire with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker.

She was fatally struck during the raid but none of the officers have been charged in her death.

“The full story and absolute truth of how this matter was handled from beginning to end is now an issue of great public interest and has become a large part of the discussion of public trust throughout the country,” Kevin Glogower, the attorney for the juror, wrote in the Monday afternoon filing, the Courier-Journal reported.

The motion accuses Cameron of using the grand jurors “as a shield to deflect accountability and responsibility for those decisions” — and asks the court to allow them to also discuss what didn’t take place during the proceedings, including “any potential charges and defendants presented or not presented,” according to the outlet.

On Monday, Hankison pleaded not guilty to three counts of wanton endangerment at his arraignment in Jefferson Circuit Court, where Judge Ann Bailey Smith also ordered “the recording of the grand jury proceedings shall be filed in the court file by noon of Wednesday this week.”

The AG said in a statement later that he would comply with the judge’s orders, despite misgivings.

“The grand jury is meant to be a secretive body,” he said, the Courier-Journal reported. “It’s apparent that the public interest in this case isn’t going to allow that to happen.”

Cameron said the grand jury agreed the officers fired in self-defense after Walker fired at them and noted that “the only charge recommended (to the grand jury) was wanton endangerment,” according to the paper.

“Our prosecutors presented all of the evidence, even though the evidence supported that Sgt. Mattingly and Detective Cosgrove were justified in their use of force after having been fired upon by Kenneth Walker,” Cameron said.

Last week, the attorney general declined to say what charges the grand jury had considered or whom it considered charging – just that homicide charges were not applicable in Taylor’s death.

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