City slickers relocate to tree houses, tents, boats and barns

Now THAT’S living off the grid! New book reveals some of the VERY unusual new homes of city slickers who have ditched concrete jungles to live in tree houses, tents, boats and barns

  • Photographer and filmmaker Foster Huntington quit his design job in New York City and bought a plot of land in rural Washington 
  • He helped design and build an unconventional multi-level tree house, where he now resides 
  • Huntington says he has no regrets about making the drastic change, and has created a new book to inspire others who are tired of the rat race 
  • Off Grid:  Your Ideal Home In The Middle of Nowhere features stories and photographs of city slickers who now live in picturesque far-flung locations 

Amid stress about the ongoing election count and anxiety due to the coronavirus pandemic, many Americans are dreaming of giving up the grind of modern life to live off the grid.  

Photographer and filmmaker Foster Huntington has done exactly that, quitting his plum design job at Ralph Lauren in New York City and moving to a multi-level tree house in rural Washington state. 

The 32-year-old helped design and build the incredible structure – known as the Cinder Cone – which is featured in his new book, Off Grid: Your Ideal Home In The Middle of Nowhere.   

The tome also includes the stories of dozens of other city-dwellers who have packed up their lives and relocated to far-flung locations across the world. 

Stunning photographs of their shipping containers, boathouses and barns fill the pages of the book.   

Photographer and filmmaker Foster Huntington quit his plum design job at Ralph Lauren in New York City to build this incredible tree house in Washington state. His new book, Off Grid: Your Ideal Home in the Middle of Nowhere, includes the stories of dozens of other city-dwellers who have packed up their lives and relocated to far-flung locations across the world

This cozy tree house, located in Roseburg, Oregon, is similar to the one Huntington now resides in. The owner must traverse a  suspended  bridge in order to reach the dwelling, which features a deck overlooking a remote valley 

Also included in Off Grid is the story behind this converted shipping container, located in New York’s Hudson Valley. While many may balk at living in such a small space, it would be an easy transition for city residents who live in similarly sized apartments

The stylish interior of the shipping container is pictured. Floor to ceiling glass doors on the left allow the space to be filled with loads of natural light. The home also features a wood burning fire to help keep it toasty during the chilly winter months 

Huntington, who also installed a hot tub and a skating bowl on the land where he built his tree house, has no regrets about leaving behind the big city. 

He says he hopes his new book will push those who have always dreamed of making a change to take the plunge. 

‘My hope for this book is to inspire people to leave cities and move to these areas and find a piece of land,’ he writes in the forward of the tome. 

‘Start with something small. Build a yurt, put down a shipping container, or level off a space for a tiny house. Plant a garden. Invite friends out for a weekend. Build a wood-fired hot tub. Create memories building a structure with your friends and loved ones. Get your hands dirty.’ 

Whilst living full-time in a tent may not be for everyone, a couple who relocated to Loomis Lake in Washington state have found a way to make their new shelter super stylish. Their chic tent features a wood burning stove and an extra large opening, which helps to maximize the impact of their tranquil surroundings 

Off Grid also features the interior of this tent, located in Wimberley, Texas.  Wimberley is a tiny town with little more than 2,000 people, meaning the owners of this stunning shelter are surrounded by peace and tranquility. However, they’re only 45 minutes away from Austin if they still need to get a fix of the city 

A tiny home is pictured under construction in Elbow Lake, Montana. Future dwellers will be able to look out over green meadows and the open sky 

City slickers relocated to this yurt in Homer, Alaska, more than 200 miles southwest of the capital city of Anchorage. The home is surrounded by fields and overlooks a picturesque valley 

This tiny tree house in Big Fork, Montana is perched at the edge of a lake and features a large wood burning hot tub that makes the perfect place to relax at the end of the day 

Off Grid also features stories of international people who have made the move to remote locations. Included in the book are images of this incredible home in Vallisaari, Finland 

Emptying their minds and their homes! The dwellings still pack loads of style and are often decorated with a minimalist aesthetic, making it easier for residents to relax without chaotic clutter 

This incredible home, seemingly inspired by J.R.R. Tolkein’s The Hobbit, is located in Powys, Wales. The cozy residence is known as ‘The Burrow’

Whilst many city slickers choose to relocate to cooler climes, such as Montana, Wyoming and Washington state, others opt for more tropical locales. This off-grid home is seen surrounded by palm trees  in sunny California 

Huntington says he hopes his new book will push those who have always dreamed of making the change to take the plunge

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