Fake Florida psychic sentenced for scamming woman out of $3 million

She didn’t see that coming! Fake psychic who conned woman out of more than $3 million is sentenced to nearly three years in prison

  • A Florida woman has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison for a multi-million dollar psychic scheme
  • Samantha Stevens, 51, and her accomplice Michael Paul Guzman, 42, scammed one woman out of more than $3 million
  • Stevens befriended the woman 10 years ago and convinced her she was cursed 
  • The woman was sentenced to two years and six months in prison while Guzman was sentenced to three years and two months  
  • The pair were also ordered to pay $3.198 million in restitution to the victim

A Florida woman and her accomplice have been sentenced for scamming a woman out of more than $3 million dollars in a psychic scheme. 

Samantha Stevens, 51, pretended to be a psychic when she befriended a woman in Miami in 2012 and convinced her that her family was cursed and needed her services. 

Stevens and her accomplice, Michael Paul Guzman, 42, used the more than $3 million they conned the woman out of to pay for vehicles, property, and gambling, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. 

The woman convinced the victim that the only way to rid her and her family of the curse was to allow Stevens to perform cleansing rituals on large sums of money. 

Samantha Stevens, 51, scammed a woman out of more than $3  million by telling her that her family was cursed

Michael Paul Guzman, 42, was an accomplice in the scheme that left one woman without $3 million

The cleansing rituals went on for years, officials say, with Stevens continuing to tell the victim the curse still had not been lifted. 

Eventually, the victim ran out of money in 2016 and that is when Stevens broke off contact. 

Stevens and Guzman both pleaded guilty to money laundering charges in a deal with prosecutors, law enforcement officials said.

On top of telling the woman her family was curse, Stevens told the victim harm would come to her and her family without the rituals. 

‘Stevens claimed she needed to perform rituals on large sums of money in order to lift the curse. Failure to do so—the victim was led to believe—would result in harm to her and her family.’

According to the Miami New Times, the fake psychic argued in court her ceremonies were an expression of her religion. 

Stevens also said the victim ‘received exactly what she bargained for.’

Stevens told the victim to rid her of the curse, she had to perform cleansing rituals on large sums of money 

After Stevens cut off the woman in 2016, he reached out to law enforcement to report the scam. 

As part of the deal, Stevens and Guzman will also have to pay $3.198 million in restitution to the victim. 

The case was investigated by Juan Antonio Gonzalez, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, and Special Agent in Charge Matthew D. Line and Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Haggerty prosecuted.   

Assistant U.S. Attorney Emily Stone will handle the asset forfeiture proceedings. 

Stevens will serve for two years and six months while Guzman has been sentenced to three years and two months

The Florida incident certainly isn’t the first psychic scam to make headlines. 

In February, one woman was arrested after she used a fake psychic to swindle her mother out of a  £50million painting. 

Sabine Coll Boghici, 48, tricked Genevieve Boghici, 83, whose late husband was an art collector, into handing over Sol Poente (1949) by Tarsila do Amaral by having a fake psychic tell her the painting was ‘cursed.’

The celebrated artwork worth £48million was previously exhibited at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA).

Police officers pose with Sol Poente by Tarsila do Amaral, which is worth £48million alone

The iconic Brazilian artwork was exhibited at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in 2018

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