Nigel Farage warns Brexit Britain ‘can’t solve Channel crisis’ until EU exit is complete

Nigel Farage says 'Brexit means Brexit' as he sips a pint

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The former UKIP leader said he sees “no other solution” to the problem, claiming that the European Convention of Human Rights is preventing the UK from tackling migration fully. He said that removing this legislation would allow the UK to “solve the Channel crisis and return people to France.” The Brexiteer added: “The heart of the problem is that Brexit has not been fully completed.

“As Boris Johnson knows very well, it will not be completed until Britain leaves the European Convention.”

Despite leaving the EU in 2020, the UK remained bound by the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), established in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU.

Mr Farage’s comments come after the Government announced earlier today that it would send asylum seekers to Rwanda for processing, as part of a crackdown on unauthorised migrants.

But he said this plan is unlikely to work, given the high costs involved and negative public opinion resulting from fears of human rights abuses.

Mr Farage cited “terrible tales of abuse and exploitation” which emerged after the Australian government attempted a similar policy twenty years ago.

He added: “The choice of Rwanda is interesting, and I can only assume that no other country was prepared to do this deal.

“Rwanda is a country with a poor human rights record that has just recently been under investigation by the UN.

“I find it difficult to believe that within a month or two we will not hear negative stories on a par with Australia’s experience.”

Human Rights Watch warned of similar issues, saying: “We have seen the severe abuses resulting from offshore processing.

“Australia’s offshore detention regime on Nauru and Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, caused more than eight years of immense human suffering.

“Twelve people have died since the policy began in 2013.

“Men, women, and children have suffered inhumane treatment and medical neglect, and years of indefinite detention led to suicides and an epidemic of self-harm.

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“The costs were also exorbitant.”

Enver Solomon, from the Refugee Council has also hit out at the plans, describing them as “cruel”.

Writing for Express.co.uk, he accused the Government of treating asylum seekers as “no more than human cargo to be shipped around”.

The UK Government’s latest policy announcement comes amid mounting concern over dangerous channel crossings.

On Monday alone, as many as 80 migrants were brought ashore in Dover while attempting to cross the channel.

As many as 60,000 people could arrive in the UK by small boats this year, according to Border Force union bosses.

Over the course of last year, at least 44 people, including three children, died or went missing while attempting to cross the channel.

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