Putin sparks attack fears in visit as chances of Russian strike ‘high’

Putin exits plane after arriving in Belarus

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Vladimir Putin has sparked fears of a fresh Russian attack with the chances of a strike said to be “very high”. The President’s visit to Minsk came hours after Russia’s latest drone attack on Ukraine. Moscow has been targeting Ukraine’s power grid since October as part of a strategy to deprive the country of heat and power during winter. His brief trip could herald more military support for the Kremlin war effort, after Belarus provided Russia with a launching pad for the invasion of Ukraine last February.

Putin said he and Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko discussed forming “a single defence space” in the region but rejected claims that Moscow was poised to swallow its neighbour.

“Russia isn’t interested in any kind of merger, it’s not feasible,” Putin said.

Putin said that he supported Lukashenko’s proposal to train the crews of Belarusian warplanes that already have been modified for using special warheads — a reference to nuclear weapons.

The visit, the first since 2018, sparked fears of a new joint attack by Russia and Belarus on other neighbouring countries.

Commenting on the meeting between the two leaders, the head of Moldova’s security service, Alexandru Musteata, said chances of a new major attack on his country are now “very high”.

Earlier this year, Russia and Belarus announced a plan to modernise Belarusian aircraft to make them nuclear-capable. Lukashenko said Belarusian crews have been training with Russia to operate planes modified to carry nuclear weapons.

Lukashenko thanked Putin for providing his military with Iskander short-range missiles and S-400 air defence systems. He also said the countries agreed to continue holding joint military exercises.

Belarus is believed to have Soviet-era weapons stockpiles that could be useful for Moscow. Lukashenko, meanwhile, needs help with his country’s ailing economy. It was a rare trip to Minsk by Putin, who usually receives Lukashenko in Russia.

Moscow has kept up its war effort despite Western sanctions and the supply of Western air defence systems to Ukrainian forces.

Sitting beside Lukashenko, Putin emphasised their close military-technical ties. He said they include not only mutual supplies of equipment but also joint work in high-tech military industries.

Analysts say the Kremlin might be seeking some kind of Belarusian military support for its Ukraine operations. But the winter weather and Russia’s depleted resources mean any big Russian attack probably won’t come soon, according to the Institute for the Study of War, a think tank in Washington.

“The capacity of the Russian military, even reinforced by elements of the Belarusian armed forces, to prepare and conduct effective large-scale mechanised offensive operations in the next few months remains questionable,” it said in an assessment published Sunday.

It concluded that “it is unlikely that Lukashenko will commit the Belarusian military (which would also have to be re-equipped) to the invasion of Ukraine.”

In Ukraine, multiple explosive drones attacked the capital before dawn. The attack came three days after what Ukrainian officials described as one of Russia’s biggest assaults on Kyiv since the war started.

Russia launched 23 self-exploding drones over Kyiv while the city slept, but Ukrainian forces shot down 18 of them, the Kyiv city administration said on Telegram. No major casualties were reported from the attack, although the Ukrainian president’s office said the war killed at least three civilians and wounded 11 elsewhere in the country between Sunday and Monday.

The drone barrage caused emergency power outages in 11 central and eastern regions, including the capital region, authorities said.

Monday was St. Nicholas Day, which marks the start of the Christmas holidays in Ukraine and is when children typically receive their first gifts hidden under pillows.

“This is how Russians congratulated our children on the holiday,” Serhii Kruk, the head of Ukraine’s State Emergency Service, wrote on Telegram, attaching photos of firefighters at a stricken infrastructure facility.

“In the night when everyone is waiting for a miracle, the terrorist country continues to terrorise the peaceful Ukrainian people,” said Ukraine’s human rights chief, Dmytro Lubinets.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky pleaded for Western countries to send sophisticated air defence systems as winter tightens its grip.

“A 100 percent air defence shield for Ukraine will be one of the most successful steps against Russian aggression,” Zelensky said by video link at a northern European regional threat conference in Latvia. “This step is needed right now.”

Wreckage from the downed drones damaged a road in the Solomianskyi district and broke windows in a multi-storey building in the Shevchenkyvskyi district of Kyiv, city officials said.

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