Report claims Iran's nuclear scientist killed by high-tech machine gun

Israel killed Iran’s top nuclear scientist with remote-control machine gun that was smuggled into the country in small parts, report claims

  • Iran’s nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was killed by Israeli special forces
  • Mossad spent months smuggling a high-tech machine gun into the country
  • Fakhrizadeh was killed on November 27 on his way to his country residence

Israeli secret agents spent months smuggling a high-tech machine gun into Iran in tiny pieces to kill the regime’s top nuclear scientist, it was revealed last night.

The remote-controlled weapon fired 13 high-accuracy rounds into Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, 62, known as the ‘father’ of Iran’s illegal atomic programme, as he was driven from the capital Tehran to his country residence last year.

The gun was so accurate that the scientist’s wife who was sitting just inches from him emerged entirely unscathed from the attack.

Israeli secret agents spent months smuggling a high-tech machine gun into Iran in tiny pieces to kill the regime’s top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh (pictured), it was revealed last night

The execution on November 27 followed an eight-month surveillance operation by Mossad, the national intelligence agency of Israel.

Israeli spies slipped into Iran to painstakingly build the machine gun piece by piece. 

It was then was hidden inside a Nissan pick-up truck – alongside a one-ton bomb primed to explode just seconds after firing the fatal shots.

Jacob Nagel, one of Israel’s most senior defence officials, said: ‘Mossad had documents proving Fakhrizadeh had worked on several nuclear warheads, each one able to cause five Hiroshimas. He was serious.’

The execution on November 27 followed an eight-month surveillance operation by Mossad, the national intelligence agency of Israel. Israeli spies slipped into Iran to painstakingly build the machine gun piece by piece. Pictured: Members of Iranian forces pray around the coffin of Mohsen Fakhrizadeh on November 30, 2020

Israel declined to comment in November and on Wednesday night an Israeli government spokesman responded to the latest report by saying: ‘We never comment on such matters. There has been no change in our position.’

Fakhrizadeh, 59, was long suspected by the West of masterminding a secret nuclear bomb programme.

He had been described by Western and Israeli intelligence services for years as the mysterious leader of a covert atomic bomb programme halted in 2003, which Israel and the United States accuse Tehran of trying to restore. Iran has long denied seeking to weaponise nuclear energy.

According to the Jewish Chronicle’s report, Iran has ‘secretly assessed that it will take six years’ before a replacement for him is ‘fully operational’ and that his death had ‘extended the period of time it would take Iran to achieve a bomb from about three-and-a-half months to two years.’

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