World's population will hit EIGHT BILLION on November 15

World’s population will hit EIGHT BILLION on November 15, with India set to surpass China as the most populated nation next year

  • By 2030, the world’s population will reach 8.5 billion and by 2100, 10.4 billion
  • Population growth was growing at its slowest pace since 1950, estimates show
  • India’s population was 1.21 billion in 2011 and will now surpass China at 1.4 billion

The world’s population is set to hit eight billion by November 15 this year, a United Nations report has revealed.

The study for World Population day revealed that the pace of mortality slowing means the world’s population will reach eight billion in just over four months time, 8.5 billion by 2030 and 10.4 billion by 2100.

Population growth was growing at its slowest pace since 1950, having fallen below 1 per cent in 2020, UN estimates showed.

The world’s population is set to hit eight billion by November 15 this year, a United Nations report has revealed

India will surpass China as the world’s most populous country in 2023, with each counting more than 1.4 billion residents this year – but the UN has warned that high fertility would challenge economic growth.

India’s population was 1.21 billion in 2011, according to the domestic census, which is conducted once a decade. The government had postponed the 2021 census due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The UK has a current population of 68.5 million in 2022, with an average annual rate of population change of 0.4 per cent compared to India’s 0.9.

The UK has a current population of 68.5 million in 2022, with an average annual rate of population change of 0.4 per cent compared to India’s 0.9

In 2021, the average fertility of the world’s population stood at 2.3 births per woman over a lifetime, having fallen from about 5 births in 1950.

Global fertility is projected to decline further to 2.1 births per woman by 2050.

‘This is an occasion to celebrate our diversity, recognize our common humanity, and marvel at advancements in health that have extended lifespans and dramatically reduced maternal and child mortality rates,’ UN Secretary-General António Guterres said in a statement.

But a growing population was a reminder of a shared responsibility of care for the planet and to ‘reflect on where we still fall short of our commitments to one another,’ he added.

Referring to an earlier World Health Organisation report which estimated about 14.9 million deaths relating to the Covid-19 pandemic between January 2020 and December 2021, the UN report said global life expectancy at birth fell to 71 years in 2021 from 72.8 years in 2019, mostly due to Covid.

The United Nations said more than half of the projected increase in the global population up to 2050 will be concentrated in eight countries – Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines and the United Republic of Tanzania.

Countries of sub-Saharan Africa are expected to contribute more than half of the increase anticipated through 2050.

However, the population of 61 countries is projected to decrease by 1 per cent or more between 2022 and 2050, driven by a fall in fertility.

European Union’s population shrinks for a second year running

The European Union’s population shrank for a second year running last year, the bloc’s statistics office said on Monday, as the region reels from over two million deaths from the coronavirus.

According to Eurostat, the population of the 27 countries that make up the bloc fell by close to 172,000 from the previous year and over 656,000 from January 2020.

‘In 2020 and 2021 the positive net migration no longer compensated for the negative natural change in the EU and, as a consequence, the EU total population has been decreasing,’ it said, pointing to impacts from the pandemic.

The number of deaths began outstripping births in the EU a decade ago, but immigration from outside the bloc helped offset the gap until the first year of the pandemic.

The European Union’s population shrank for a second year running last year, the bloc’s statistics office said on Monday

The previous time the EU had registered a fall in population was in 2011 – the only other time since 1960 – but this rapidly picked up due to net migration.

Eurostat said deaths should continue to outstrip births in the coming years given the pandemic, an aging population and relatively low fertility rates.

‘Should this be the case, the EU’s overall population decline or growth in the future is likely to depend largely on the contribution made by net migration,’ the report said.

More than half of EU member states saw their populations increase, with France leading, then Netherlands and Sweden.

Italy, Poland and Romania recorded the largest population falls in the EU. 

Eurostat counted 446.8 million people living inside the EU by January 2022.

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