Zodiac Killer 'identified' as Gary Francis Poste by cold case team who they say is linked to ANOTHER murder

THE Zodiac Killer who terrorized the San Francisco area in the 1960s has finally been identified, a group of cold case investigators say.

The Case Breakers, a team of specialists who have worked to crack a number of America's most high-profile unsolved cases, claimed to have uncovered the Zodiac Killer's identity on Wednesday.

The man they say is responsible for the string of five murders in 1968 and 1969 is Gary Francis Poste, who died in 2018.

They also claim to have linked Poste to a sixth killing hundreds of miles away that has never before been connected to the Zodiac.

The Zodiac Killer is believed to be a California man who gave himself that nickname to conceal his identity from authorities.

He is known to have targeted at least seven victims – three couples and a lone taxi driver. Two of them survived gun and knife ambushes.

The same killer has been linked to as many as 28 murders — claiming to have killed 37 people in taunting letters sent to newspapers and police.

The letters included complex ciphers – some of which haven't been officially solved to this day.

The case was deemed inactive in 2004 but the San Francisco Police Department reopened it in March of 2007.

Over the years, many independent sleuths have claimed to have decoded the Zodiac's true identity.

THE LATEST SUSPECT

The Case Breakers crew is comprised of more than 40 former law enforcement investigators, journalists and military intelligence officers.

The team said they discovered Poste's identity after years of digging through new forensic evidence and his darkroom.

One image uncovered from the darkroom purportedly featured scars on Poste's forehead which match a sketch of the Zodiac.

The team said the Zodiac's ciphers also point to Poste.

In one note, removing the letters of Poste's full name revealed an alternate message, according to former Army counterintelligence agent Jen Bucholtz.

"So you've got to know Gary's full name in order to decipher these anagrams," Bucholtz told Fox News.

"I just don't think there's any other way anybody would have figured it out."

This is a developing story…

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